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PRIVACY & INFO ON THIS WEBSITE

 
 
 
     

INDEMNITY AND PRIVACY

The information on this website belongs to all the whanau of our tipuna Maori Chief Tanguru & son Kemp and all those whanau involved in the Waitangi Claims on the Government injustices. Special thanks go to the following present and past Kaumatua & Kuia who provided & guided us with their profound knowledge.

 

1/. All the information on this website has been collated over many years by various whanau for the Te Keepa website and for our tamariki. Some of this information is not for public viewing with no links but rather published in our case to the NZ Government on the wrong doings of the Government agents and what is our right to negotiate via tikanga. Although we portray what we have seen as correct any inquiries will be brought up only by a meeting of our whanau Committee members. We will not retract statements that we feel are not in the public interest & the interest of out tipuna Major Kemp.

2/. We will not be held accountable for any misrepresentation under the NZ Bill of Rights 1990 that we may have written about our tipuna as some of this information has been passed down by our tipuna and kuia / kaumatua and we are guided by their wisdom and knowledge. As there is not a lot of written knowledge & information regarding Maori prior to the years 1840 a lot of the information during this time was by word of mouth and nothing written down. Some Maori had no birth certificates while others were whangai out to other whanau and many signed their name with an X. Chiefs during this time would venture to and from the South Island and it was customary for Maori to have their daughter to guide the chief and in saying that as my mother explained Maori tikanga played its role in the traditional role of Maori and so it should as that is what gives strength to any Maori tribe or for that matter world tribes. In todays world this has been forgotten as it has been a fight for money and power for a few with little regard to the broader spectrum of the tribal welfare itself.

3/.The Muaupoko Tribal Authority or MTA have never sort dialogue with all the other claimants, had a false AGM in 2011 based on corrupt practices for the minority not majority & no AGM 2012.

 

4/. With the Waitangi Claim we will not be accused by any parties of what we write as it is a true and factual account of what we received by lawyers and others involved and this account is for not only for the public well being who wish to read but also for our upcoming tamariki and those whanau who live overseaswho are oblivious to what is really happening. Any action by those who believe we have breached their personal well being will be dealt with by our legal team here and overseas---- accordingly but please note --- it will be class action & our rights under the 1990 NZ Bill of rights as per below.

We have been blessed at having a good amount of literature we have managed to save as well as historic records and books to help guide us. But in saying this some statements about Kemp & his father Tanguru are sketchy and we rectify where we see it appropriate as information is received. All matters are brought to the attention of our whanau Board Committee members for discussion then exercised for publication.

Note we have collated our research over 40-50 years and where we feel we need to find out more info we certainly will and rectify. In the meantime the ownership of this website is with the Board of Management for all descendents of Major Te Keepa te Rangihirinui [ Kemp] & is owned by all whanau who whakapapa to Kemp and his father Tanguru as well as those disadvantaged whanau & Wai Claimants in the Tribe that have been unfairly treated.

5/. Our special thanks to Gerard McCoy QC for his expert knowledge on the latest Supreme Court issues regarding Lake Horowhenua and to those who are genuinely supporting ALL the owners of the Lake not just themselves.We also acknowledge the work by Cr Anne Hunt for her input in legalities as well as our United Nations USA lawyer Paul Crown for his guidance and advice.Also to our tipuna:Rangitira: J.J. Tukapua, James Broughton, Bunny Greenland,Jim & Tereasa Moses, Mirita Ranginui, Josephine Paki,and the many other kuia /kaumatua & tipuna who have and were dedicated to the just cause of Maori.

6/. The New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990. Democratic and Civil Rights. We reserve our rights to:

  • Freedom of expression;
  • Freedom of peaceful assembly;
  • Freedom of association;
  • Freedom of thought, conscience, religion and belief.

This website protection is based under Part 2 of the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990. protection under s 14 of the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990.  Sir Stephen Sedley  in Redmond-Bate v DPP:6  Free speech includes not only the inoffensive but the irritating, the contentious, the eccentric, the heretical, the unwelcome, and the provocative provided it does not tend to provoke violence. Freedom only to speak inoffensively is not worth having. What Speakers Corner (to which the law applies as fully as anywhere else) demonstrates is the tolerance which is both extended by the law to opinion of every kind expected by the law and conduct of those who disagree, even strongly with what they hear.
The above decision was set within the framework of the European Convention on Human Rights, the same liberal outlook pervades the common law of New Zealand as much as it does that of England. And of course, it receives statutory reinforcement in Part 2 of the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990 and the right of this website to portray the truth to the beneficiaries of owners who have been subjected to wrongs by both Government agents and within.

We also apply augmented threshold protection given by Part 2 of the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990. In a sense that is the point in effect made by Sir Stephen Sedley in the passage quoted earlier. See Coleman v Power:9
One might wish for more rationality, less superficiality, diminished invective and increased logic and persuasion in political discourse. But those of that view must find another homeland. From its earliest history, Australian politics has regularly included insult and emotion, calumny and invective, in its armoury of persuasion. They are part and parcel of the struggle of ideas”.
More info on the  Bill of Rights Act contact Human Rights Commission, Citizens' Advice Bureau, Community Law Centre, or the Ministry of Justice or ask us.


PDF document iconbill-of-rights.pdf — PDF document, 86 kB (88130 bytes)

7/. Our rights under the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

Article 1
Indigenous peoples have the right to the full enjoyment, as a collective or as individuals, of all human rights and fundamental freedoms as recognized in the Charter of the United Nations, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights4 and international human rights law.
Article 2
Indigenous peoples and individuals are free and equal to all other peoples and individuals and have the right to be free from any kind of discrimination, in the exercise of their rights, in particular that based on their indigenous origin or identity.

Article 3
Indigenous peoples have the right to self-determination. By virtue of that right they freely determine their political status and freely pursue their economic, social and cultural development.
Article 4
Indigenous peoples, in exercising their right to self-determination, have the right to autonomy or self-government in matters relating to their internal and local affairs, as well as ways and means for financing their autonomous functions.
Article 5
Indigenous peoples have the right to maintain and strengthen their distinct political, legal, economic, social and cultural institutions, while retaining their right to participate fully, if they so choose, in the political, economic, social and cultural life of the State.
Article 6
Every indigenous individual has the right to a nationality.
Article 7
1. Indigenous individuals have the rights to life, physical and mental integrity, liberty and security of person.
2. Indigenous peoples have the collective right to live in freedom, peace and security as distinct peoples and shall not be subjected to any act of genocide or any other act of violence, including forcibly removing children of the group to another group.
Article 8
1. Indigenous peoples and individuals have the right not to be subjected to forced assimilation or destruction of their culture.
2. States shall provide effective mechanisms for prevention of, and redress for:
(a) Any action which has the aim or effect of depriving them of their integrity as distinct peoples, or of their cultural values
or ethnic identities;
(b) Any action which has the aim or effect of dispossessing them of their lands, territories or resources;
(c) Any form of forced population transfer which has the aim or effect of violating or undermining any of their rights;
(d) Any form of forced assimilation or integration;
(e) Any form of propaganda designed to promote or incite racial or ethnic discrimination directed against them.Article 9
Indigenous peoples and individuals have the right to belong to an indigenous community or nation, in accordance with the traditions and customs of the community or nation concerned. No discrimination of any kind may arise from the exercise of such a right.
Article 10
Indigenous peoples shall not be forcibly removed from their lands or territories. No relocation shall take place without the free, prior and informed consent of the indigenous peoples concerned and after agreement on just and fair compensation and, where possible, with the option of return.
Article 11
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to practise and revitalize their cultural traditions and customs. This includes the right to maintain, protect and develop the past, present and future manifestations of their cultures, such as archaeological and historical sites, artefacts, designs, ceremonies, technologies and visual and performing arts and literature.
2. States shall provide redress through effective mechanisms, which may include restitution, developed in conjunction with indigenous peoples, with respect to their cultural, intellectual, religious and spiritual property taken without their free, prior and informed consent or in violation of their laws, traditions and customs.
Article 12
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to manifest, practise, develop and teach their spiritual and religious traditions, customs and ceremonies; the right to maintain, protect, and have access in privacy to their religious and cultural sites; the right to the use and control of their ceremonial objects; and the right to the repatriation of their human remains.
2. States shall seek to enable the access and/or repatriation of ceremonial objects and human remains in their possession through fair, transparent and effective mechanisms developed in conjunction with indigenous peoples concerned.Article 13
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to revitalize, use, develop and transmit to future generations their histories, languages, oral traditions, philosophies, writing systems and literatures, and to designate and retain their own names for communities, places and persons.
2. States shall take effective measures to ensure that this right is protected and also to ensure that indigenous peoples can understand and be understood in political, legal and administrative proceedings, where necessary through the provision of interpretation or by other appropriate means.
Article 14
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to establish and control their educational systems and institutions providing education in their own languages, in a manner appropriate to their cultural methods of teaching and learning.
2. Indigenous individuals, particularly children, have the right to all levels and forms of education of the State without discrimination.
3. States shall, in conjunction with indigenous peoples, take effective measures, in order for indigenous individuals, particularly children, including those living outside their communities, to have access, when possible, to an education in their own culture and provided in their own language.
Article 15
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to the dignity and diversity of their cultures, traditions, histories and aspirations which shall be appropriately reflected in education and public information.
2. States shall take effective measures, in consultation and cooperation with the indigenous peoples concerned, to combat prejudice and eliminate discrimination and to promote tolerance, understanding and good relations among indigenous peoples and all other segments of society.
Article 16
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to establish their own media in their own languages and to have access to all forms of non-indigenous media without discrimination.2. States shall take effective measures to ensure that State-owned
media duly reflect indigenous cultural diversity. States, without prejudice to ensuring full freedom of expression, should encourage privately owned media to adequately reflect indigenous cultural diversity.
Article 17
1. Indigenous individuals and peoples have the right to enjoy fully all rights established under applicable international and domestic labour law.
2. States shall in consultation and cooperation with indigenous peoples take specific measures to protect indigenous children from economic exploitation and from performing any work that is likely to be hazardous or to interfere with the child’s education, or to be harmful to the child’s health or physical, mental, spiritual, moral or social development, taking into account their special vulnerability and the importance of education for their empowerment.
3. Indigenous individuals have the right not to be subjected to any discriminatory conditions of labour and, inter alia, employment or salary.
Article 18
Indigenous peoples have the right to participate in decision-making in matters which would affect their rights, through representatives chosen by themselves in accordance with their own procedures, as well as to maintain and develop their own indigenous decisionmaking institutions.
Article 19
States shall consult and cooperate in good faith with the indigenous peoples concerned through their own representative institutions in order to obtain their free, prior and informed consent before adopting and implementing legislative or administrative measures that may affect them.
Article 20
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to maintain and develop their political, economic and social systems or institutions, to be secure in the enjoyment of their own means of subsistence and development, and to engage freely in all their traditional and other economicactivities.2. Indigenous peoples deprived of their means of subsistence and development are entitled to just and fair redress.
Article 21
1. Indigenous peoples have the right, without discrimination, to the improvement of their economic and social conditions, including,inter alia, in the areas of education, employment, vocational training and retraining, housing, sanitation, health and social security.
2. States shall take effective measures and, where appropriate, special measures to ensure continuing improvement of their economic and social conditions. Particular attention shall be paid to the rights and special needs of indigenous elders, women, youth, children and persons with disabilities.
Article 22
1. Particular attention shall be paid to the rights and special needs of indigenous elders, women, youth, children and persons with disabilities in the implementation of this Declaration.
2. States shall take measures, in conjunction with indigenous peoples, to ensure that indigenous women and children enjoy the full protection and guarantees against all forms of violence and discrimination.
Article 23
Indigenous peoples have the right to determine and develop priorities and strategies for exercising their right to development. In particular, indigenous peoples have the right to be actively involved in developing and determining health, housing and other economic and social programmes affecting them and, as far as possible, to administer such programmes through their own institutions.
Article 24
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to their traditional medicines and to maintain their health practices, including the conservation of their vital medicinal plants, animals and minerals. Indigenous individuals also have the right to access, without any discrimination, to all social and health services.
2. Indigenous individuals have an equal right to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health. States shall take the necessary steps with a view to achieving progressively the full realization of this right.

Article 25
Indigenous peoples have the right to maintain and strengthen their distinctive spiritual relationship with their traditionally owned or otherwise occupied and used lands, territories, waters and coastal seas and other resources and to uphold their responsibilities to future generations in this regard.
Article 26
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to the lands, territories and resources which they have traditionally owned, occupied or otherwise used or acquired.
2. Indigenous peoples have the right to own, use, develop and control the lands, territories and resources that they possess by reason of traditional ownership or other traditional occupation or use, as well as those which they have otherwise acquired.
3. States shall give legal recognition and protection to these lands, territories and resources. Such recognition shall be conducted with due respect to the customs, traditions and land tenure systems of the indigenous peoples concerned.
Article 27
States shall establish and implement, in conjunction with indigenous peoples concerned, a fair, independent, impartial, open and transparent process, giving due recognition to indigenous peoples’ laws, traditions, customs and land tenure systems, to recognize and adjudicate the rights of indigenous peoples pertaining to their lands, territories and resources, including those which were traditionally owned or otherwise occupied or used. Indigenous peoples shall have
the right to participate in this process.
Article 28
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to redress, by means that can include restitution or, when this is not possible, just, fair and equitable compensation, for the lands, territories and resources which they have traditionally owned or otherwise occupied or used, and which have been confiscated, taken, occupied, used or damaged without their free, prior and informed consent.
2. Unless otherwise freely agreed upon by the peoples concerned, compensation shall take the form of lands, territories and resourcesequal in quality, size and legal status or of monetary compensation or other appropriate redress.
Article 29
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to the conservation and protection of the environment and the productive capacity of their lands or territories and resources. States shall establish and implement assistance programmes for indigenous peoples for such conservation and protection, without discrimination.
2. States shall take effective measures to ensure that no storage or disposal of hazardous materials shall take place in the lands or territories of indigenous peoples without their free, prior and informed consent.
3. States shall also take effective measures to ensure, as needed, that programmes for monitoring, maintaining and restoring the health of indigenous peoples, as developed and implemented by the peoples affected by such materials, are duly implemented.
Article 30
1. Military activities shall not take place in the lands or territories of indigenous peoples, unless justified by a relevant public interest or otherwise freely agreed with or requested by the indigenous peoples concerned.
2. States shall undertake effective consultations with the indigenous peoples concerned, through appropriate procedures and in particular through their representative institutions, prior to using their lands or territories for military activities.
Article 31
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to maintain, control, protect and develop their cultural heritage, traditional knowledge and traditional cultural expressions, as well as the manifestations of their sciences, technologies and cultures, including human and genetic resources, seeds, medicines, knowledge of the properties of fauna and flora, oral traditions, literatures, designs, sports and traditional games and visual and performing arts. They also have the right to
maintain, control, protect and develop their intellectual property over such cultural heritage, traditional knowledge, and traditional cultural expressions.2. In conjunction with indigenous peoples, States shall take effective measures to recognize and protect the exercise of these rights.
Article 32
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to determine and develop priorities and strategies for the development or use of their lands or territories and other resources.
2. States shall consult and cooperate in good faith with the indigenous peoples concerned through their own representative institutions in order to obtain their free and informed consent prior to the approval of any project affecting their lands or territories and other resources, particularly in connection with the development, utilization or exploitation of mineral, water or other resources.
3. States shall provide effective mechanisms for just and fair redress for any such activities, and appropriate measures shall be taken to mitigate adverse environmental, economic, social, cultural or spiritual impact.
Article 33
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to determine their own identity or membership in accordance with their customs and traditions. This does not impair the right of indigenous individuals to obtain citizenship of the States in which they live.
2. Indigenous peoples have the right to determine the structures and to select the membership of their institutions in accordance with their own procedures.
Article 34
Indigenous peoples have the right to promote, develop and maintain their institutional structures and their distinctive customs, spirituality, traditions, procedures, practices and, in the cases where they exist, juridical systems or customs, in accordance with international human rights standards.
Article 35
Indigenous peoples have the right to determine the responsibilities of individuals to their communities.

Article 36
1. Indigenous peoples, in particular those divided by international borders, have the right to maintain and develop contacts, relations and cooperation, including activities for spiritual, cultural, political, economic and social purposes, with their own members as well as other peoples across borders.
2. States, in consultation and cooperation with indigenous peoples, shall take effective measures to facilitate the exercise and ensure the implementation of this right.
Article 37
1. Indigenous peoples have the right to the recognition, observance and enforcement of treaties, agreements and other constructive arrangements concluded with States or their successors and to have States honour and respect such treaties, agreements and other constructive arrangements.
2. Nothing in this Declaration may be interpreted as diminishing or eliminating the rights of indigenous peoples contained in treaties, agreements and other constructive arrangements.
Article 38
States, in consultation and cooperation with indigenous peoples, shall take the appropriate measures, including legislative measures, to achieve the ends of this Declaration.
Article 39
Indigenous peoples have the right to have access to financial and technical assistance from States and through international cooperation, for the enjoyment of the rights contained in this Declaration.
Article 40
Indigenous peoples have the right to access to and prompt decision through just and fair procedures for the resolution of conflicts and disputes with States or other parties, as well as to effective remedies for all infringements of their individual and collective rights. Such a decision shall give due consideration to the customs, traditions, rules and legal systems of the indigenous peoples concerned and international human rights.

Article 41
The organs and specialized agencies of the United Nations system and other intergovernmental organizations shall contribute to the full realization of the provisions of this Declaration through the mobilization, inter alia, of financial cooperation and technical assistance. Ways and means of ensuring participation of indigenous peoples on issues
affecting them shall be established.
Article 42
The United Nations, its bodies, including the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, and specialized agencies, including at the country level, and States shall promote respect for and full application of the provisions of this Declaration and follow up the effectiveness of this Declaration.
Article 43
The rights recognized herein constitute the minimum standards for the survival, dignity and well-being of the indigenous peoples of the world.
Article 44
All the rights and freedoms recognized herein are equally guaranteed to male and female indigenous individuals.
Article 45
Nothing in this Declaration may be construed as diminishing or extinguishing the rights indigenous peoples have now or may acquire in the future.
Article 46
1. Nothing in this Declaration may be interpreted as implying for any State, people, group or person any right to engage in any activity or to perform any act contrary to the Charter of the United Nations or construed as authorizing or encouraging any action which would dismember or impair, totally or in part, the territorial integrity or political unity of sovereign and independent States.
2. In the exercise of the rights enunciated in the present Declaration, human rights and fundamental freedoms of all shall be respected. The exercise of the rights set forth in this Declaration shall be subject only to such limitations as are determined by lawand in accordance with international human rights obligations. Any such limitations shall be non-discriminatory and strictly necessary solely for the purpose of securing due recognition and respect for the rights and freedoms of others and for meeting the just and most compelling requirements of a democratic society.
3. The provisions set forth in this Declaration shall be interpreted in accordance with the principles of justice, democracy, respect for human rights, equality, non-discrimination, good governance and good faith.

 

Owners in Block 11 ----who wish to voice their concerns especially overseas owners we welcome your input.

We welcome other Iwi mail on your concerns, "Freedom of expression- Everyone has the right to freedom of expression, including the freedom to seek, receive, and impart information and opinions of any kind in any form."

 

 

Major te Rangihirinui Te Keepa Kemp

Major Kemp and Tanguru Chiefs of Muaupoko Tribe NZ
 

[ History ] [ Wai 108 claim ] [ Office of Treaty Settlements ]

[ Lake news 2018 ] [ WECA Water & Environment group 2018 ] [ Drains,inlets and streams feeding the Lake 2018 ]

[ Arawhata flooding June 20th 2015 ] [ Listener Karl du Fresne Report Lake Aug 2014 ] [ Lake Trustees vote to remove Lake buildings? ] [ Sir Wira Gardiners shock report about MTA Nov 2013 ] [ Horowhenua Council Rating June 2014 ]

[ CFRT Crown Forestry Rental Trust] [ The money grab ] [ MCC- Muaupoko Cluster Group ] [ Horowhenua Lake 2013 ] [ ROLD Act ] [ Horowhenua Lake Trust ] [ OTS selling our Landbanked hospital & kimberley ] [ Lake Accord 2013 to NOT clean our Lake ] [ Lake Lobby Group 2013 to clean our Lake ] [ Horowhenua Council Polluters ] [ Lake Accord 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Please note some pages on this website are unlisted for public viewing. Info has been collated from oral conversations from kuia & kaumatua & text material we have accumulated over years. [ Info Indemnity ]